Creating Compelling Photography Through Human Understanding


Eyal Gamili sees everything as a puzzle.

A human puzzle with pieces that constantly change.

“Before I even think about equipment or lighting or anything technical,” Gamili said, “I start with the humanity, the real person.”

He says everyone wants to create imagery that captures a feeling or theme or idea that can rarely be expressed fully in words.

“That’s the beautiful part for me, and the challenge,” said Gamili. “I try to take the time to really understand my clients and drill down to exactly what it is they want to express.”

He is a videographer, photographer, entrepreneur, and social media expert who is virtually obsessed with creating from this human vantage point. He said he started with technology and it was stifling.

“Technology is important,” Gamili said. “But it makes a weak starting point. It never generates the best ideas. Every time I start with talking through and really understanding the depth of what someone is trying to express, and why it is important to them; that’s when the path of creativity become clear.”

And it shows in the diverse success he has achieved in creating projects for decidedly different types of businesses.

He started off shooting short films about extreme sports, video dance, and rock climbing. And he has a special passion for food photography which began when his wife, Shani, was diagnosed with cancer.

That very personal and human story led to creating a number of short commercials for major chefs like Chef Frank Azulay, YouTubers like Or Ben Oliel whom he worked with to create the Vegetarian Spring Rolls recipe Gluten-free Dessert video, and restaurant chains and global brands like Le Creuset Cookware and Maille Flavor Heroes.

In every case, interviewing the client to find the unexpressed wants and needs—the human connections they really wanted—was the key to everything. He says it always takes extra time, but it’s critically important time in forming an effective creative direction.

“That’s was the turning point for me. For me as a photographer and artist,” said Gamili. “Without the human piece, none of the technology makes sense. It’s always lacking.”

One of his most compelling projects exemplifies this human component.

Gamili was commissioned to produce a video that gave clients the actual experience of a specialized kind of water therapy.

He created an almost hypnotic underwater video titled Water Healing Hydropathy, a type of occupational therapy and physiotherapy that involves the use of water for pain relief and treatment. Each moment is a kind of transportation and immersion into the actual experience.

“It was one of the most connected and inspired projects I’ve ever worked on,” Gamili said. “It was so clear that the human side of this special therapy just didn’t translate in words. We needed a way to help people experience the beauty of the therapy as a means of understanding it more completely.”

Gamili has founded two websites that profile his work and offer videography, branding, and PR services to businesses: Foo-food.com and AbstractZen.com. Foo-food focuses on recipes for healthy eating, while AbstractZen features Gamili’s videos on dance, fashion, music, mountain-climbing, beauty, and eco-living. He also employs a number of recognized food styling, fashion, social media, and content writing professionals for each of his projects, such as Hollywood composer Erez Koskas, and Israel’s Master Chef reality show winner Tom Franz.

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